anybody have ESPN insider?

Discuss anything related to Golden State Warriors basketball here

Moderators: Mr. Crackerz, JREED, Guybrush, hobbes


Starting Lineup
Posts: 675
Joined: Wed Jul 07, 2004 11:00 am
Location: THE City
Poster Credit: 0
PostPosted: Sun Jan 21, 2007 11:38 am
Just wondering what the analysts are saying about the deal... if someone with an insider account could copy and paste to here? Thanks in advance

article 1:
http://insider.espn.go.com/espn/blog/in ... stein_marc

article 2:
http://insider.espn.go.com/nba/insider/ ... %3d2734001

article 3:
http://insider.espn.go.com/nba/insider/ ... %3d2734353

...it's been a long time since I've posted on here...
Here we go again...
User avatar
Hall of Famer
Posts: 18461
Joined: Sat Oct 08, 2005 4:48 am
Location: Somewhere in this site...
Poster Credit: -4
PostPosted: Sun Jan 21, 2007 11:45 am
Welcome back, BY.

Hollinjerk:

JOHN HOLLINGER | ESPN.com Insider
On the surface, this looks like a classic "grass-is-greener" trade.

Contrary to the expectations of many, Dunleavy and Murphy haven't meshed with new coach Don Nelson and his wide-open system, though Dunleavy has raised his level of play.

Meanwhile, the mutterings about chemistry problems in Indiana long have centered on Jackson -- especially since his arrest on felony charges in October -- and Harrington has endured an unexpectedly bumpy ride in his first campaign since rejoining the Pacers.

Look a little deeper, though, and you'll see this more as a Trojan horse deal.

Why? Because, while Jackson, Dunleavy, Murphy and Harrington are the four names in all the headlines, the guy who could make the trade a home run for the Pacers is Diogu. …

If you take Diogu and Powell out of the trade, this deal starts looking a lot more reasonable -- Golden State upgrades the backcourt a bit, gets a slight improvement in the cap situation, takes on a bad apple in the locker room and makes a slight downgrade from Murphy to Harrington. That seems fair. But to throw in Diogu on top of it? That's absurd. Or it's genius, if you're looking at it from Indiana's perspective. The other names are nice and all, but 10 years from now I have a feeling that we'll be looking back on this deal as the Ike Diogu trade. And if you're a Warriors fan, you probably won't be looking back fondly.


Stein:

MARC STEIN | ESPN.com
I suppose that I still have to pick a team that "won" this one, so I have to go with Golden State at first glance, mainly because the Warriors were able to move two albatross contracts (Dunleavy's ranking worse than Murphy's) without being forced to part with Baron Davis, Jason Richardson, Monta Ellis, Andris Biedrins, Mickael Pietrus or even Matt Barnes ... and selfishly because Nellie has a history of getting beaucoup production from guys named Sarunas (see: Marciulionis).

To be swayed back in Indiana's direction would require knowing that Diogu will definitely turn out to be a player . . . or knowing how O'Neal's future will play out, with JO and management still on course for an end-of-season date to re-assess their futures together . . . or knowing for certain that the Pacers could now move Dunleavy to the Clippers for Corey Maggette. Informed sources in L.A. insist that the Clips won't do that deal even if Clips coach Mike Dunleavy Sr. keeps lobbying for it.


Weltman:

JEFF WELTMAN | Scouts Inc.
I don't see this deal making either a team to fear, but both are idling around the .500 mark and at least get a shot in the arm.

Diogu is the lone impact player -- or possible impact player -- in the deal who's yet to reach his potential. He could prove to be the most valuable player in the trade, especially given that he has two seasons remaining on his rookie deal after this one. If Diogu can become a significant low-post scorer for Indiana, he could (alongside the likes of Danny Granger, David Harrison and Shawne Williams) become an important piece of the foundation for the next generation of Pacers basketball.


There are more analysis in the Pacers site:

http://www.nba.com/pacers/news/experts_analysis_070118.html

#32 has insider. I guess he'll post them later if they're different from the ones I've posted.

All Star
Posts: 2759
Joined: Tue Dec 06, 2005 4:46 pm
Poster Credit: 8
PostPosted: Sun Jan 21, 2007 12:17 pm
Ike can eventually become an impact player; he may even do this rather quickly in Indiana. He, unfortunately, had no chance of becoming an impact player here as long as Nelson was coaching this team.

Mullin drafted Ike thinking that the team would be developed as a conventional team under the direction of Monty. Baron, Richardson, Dunleavy, Murphy, Foyle would have been Mullin's choice as starters with Ike, Monta, and Biedrens coming off the bench. Perhaps this lineup would have worked if there was a strong tactician on the bench who could have better utilized their talents. Monty was not the man for this. Also, it was flawed reasoning for Mullin to believe that Dunleavy, Murphy, and Foyle could ever be 3/5 of the starting lineup for a playoff caliber team (duh!).

While getting outmaneuvered by by Petrie for Artest and not being able to make his promised offseason blockbuster trade, Mullin panicked and turned to Nelson, a guy who can improve a team thru unconventional lineups and matchups using smaller players. Mullin did not expect Nelson to publicily criticize his, Mullin's, pet players (read: Dunleavy, Murphy, Ike, and Foyle) and had to make a move before the media and fans would actually begin to scrutinize Mullin's disjointed tenure as the team's front office executive. Hence, the trade with Indiana was made.

The team now has Don Nelson type of players who can get out and run the floor. Also, the newcomers are not jaded by Foyle's propensity to turn the ball over by dropping easy passes and will (at least in the early stages of their tenure here) get Foyle the ball in pick and roll situations, which is good, and will keep defenses more honest and allow for the Warriors to have better dribble penetration into the key.

Lastly, Hollinger, Stein and Weltman (sounds like a bad law firm) have not had the opportunity to watch Dunleavy and Murphy struggle on this Warrior team. Even with the team having to give up Ike, this trade makes much sense for the Warriors. Dunleavy is a guy who will disappear for 3-5 games (look for his picture on a milk carton) and then have a good game; a good player will have 3-5 good games and then possibly disappear for a game. Murphy was the worst double-double guy in the league and did not have the ability to make a bad team better. He, Murphy, might be a guy who could make a good team better (I can imagine Murphy on a San Antonio team, a Miami team, or a Houston team, where there is a true low post presence. Murphy would be the big man's version of Steve Kerr and would probably become the dagger that would put other teams out).

The ESPN crew also did not take into account that Baron Davis has been injury prone and with the addition of our new Euro (Nelson calls him Cabbage), we now have a legitimate backup point guard. Also, Powell may become for this Don Nelson team what Raja Bell had become in Dallas, a gritty and in your face guy who will scrap for playing time thru hustle.

This trade makes sense for the Warriors. It also makes sense for the Pacers.
User avatar
All Star
Posts: 3042
Joined: Thu Mar 09, 2006 5:42 pm
Poster Credit: 0
PostPosted: Sun Jan 21, 2007 12:34 pm
uptempo wrote:Ike can eventually become an impact player; he may even do this rather quickly in Indiana. He, unfortunately, had no chance of becoming an impact player here as long as Nelson was coaching this team.

Mullin drafted Ike thinking that the team would be developed as a conventional team under the direction of Monty. Baron, Richardson, Dunleavy, Murphy, Foyle would have been Mullin's choice as starters with Ike, Monta, and Biedrens coming off the bench. Perhaps this lineup would have worked if there was a strong tactician on the bench who could have better utilized their talents. Monty was not the man for this. Also, it was flawed reasoning for Mullin to believe that Dunleavy, Murphy, and Foyle could ever be 3/5 of the starting lineup for a playoff caliber team (duh!).

While getting outmaneuvered by by Petrie for Artest and not being able to make his promised offseason blockbuster trade, Mullin panicked and turned to Nelson, a guy who can improve a team thru unconventional lineups and matchups using smaller players. Mullin did not expect Nelson to publicily criticize his, Mullin's, pet players (read: Dunleavy, Murphy, Ike, and Foyle) and had to make a move before the media and fans would actually begin to scrutinize Mullin's disjointed tenure as the team's front office executive. Hence, the trade with Indiana was made.

The team now has Don Nelson type of players who can get out and run the floor. Also, the newcomers are not jaded by Foyle's propensity to turn the ball over by dropping easy passes and will (at least in the early stages of their tenure here) get Foyle the ball in pick and roll situations, which is good, and will keep defenses more honest and allow for the Warriors to have better dribble penetration into the key.

Lastly, Hollinger, Stein and Weltman (sounds like a bad law firm) have not had the opportunity to watch Dunleavy and Murphy struggle on this Warrior team. Even with the team having to give up Ike, this trade makes much sense for the Warriors. Dunleavy is a guy who will disappear for 3-5 games (look for his picture on a milk carton) and then have a good game; a good player will have 3-5 good games and then possibly disappear for a game. Murphy was the worst double-double guy in the league and did not have the ability to make a bad team better. He, Murphy, might be a guy who could make a good team better (I can imagine Murphy on a San Antonio team, a Miami team, or a Houston team, where there is a true low post presence. Murphy would be the big man's version of Steve Kerr and would probably become the dagger that would put other teams out).

The ESPN crew also did not take into account that Baron Davis has been injury prone and with the addition of our new Euro (Nelson calls him Cabbage), we now have a legitimate backup point guard. Also, Powell may become for this Don Nelson team what Raja Bell had become in Dallas, a gritty and in your face guy who will scrap for playing time thru hustle.

This trade makes sense for the Warriors. It also makes sense for the Pacers.

Just a great analysis, Uptempo. Not surprisingly, Stein had the best take of the analysts and Hollinjerk was ludicrous. Stein is a smart and rational analyst, Hollinger would rather look at #s than watch the actual players play. He's the kind of guy who would rather stroke to the picture on my signature than f**k a real woman. The only way Hollinjerk could claim that murphy to harrington is a downgrade is BECAUSE HE DOESNT WATCH THE GAMES!!!

I see this as a clean steal for the Ws and believe that perhaps the steals of steals are Cabbage (a really nice backup PG, who looked utterly confident out there last night) and even more so, Stephen Jackson. This guy has always been a good player, an excellent 3rd option, who can pass, move, play Dand always brings it. Also, he will be a better fit culturally in Oaktown than in the culturally washed out and reactionary wasteland of Indy (almost as bad a place to live as Cleaved-land).
To Live is A Value Judgment - Albert Camus
3 reasons for living: Jazz, Hoops and women

President Barack Hussein Obama - America chose Hope over Fear
ImageImage
User avatar
Hall of Famer
Posts: 18461
Joined: Sat Oct 08, 2005 4:48 am
Location: Somewhere in this site...
Poster Credit: -4
PostPosted: Sun Jan 21, 2007 12:38 pm
coltraning wrote:Just a great analysis, Uptempo. Not surprisingly, Stein had the best take of the analysts and Hollinjerk was ludicrous. Stein is a smart and rational analyst, Hollinger would rather look at #s than watch the actual players play. He's the kind of guy who would rather stroke to the picture on my signature than f**k a real woman. The only way Hollinjerk could claim that murphy to harrington is a downgrade is BECAUSE HE DOESNT WATCH THE GAMES!!!



[sarcasm]
Hey, who can blame him?. I'd also rather watch stats than real games...
[/sarcasm]

All Star
Posts: 2759
Joined: Tue Dec 06, 2005 4:46 pm
Poster Credit: 8
PostPosted: Sun Jan 21, 2007 1:36 pm
This team now has the talent and the athletes to play with Phoenix and Denver. The only teams in the West that this Warrior team will have any difficulty matching up on will be San Antonio and Houston, two teams with dominant inside players.

Even Foyle will be a better player with these new players. Foyle will be the recipient of passes off the pick and roll. Last night he actually caught the passes, converted on two, and kicked out on a third.

Jackson knows how to make the nice pass inside to a cutting Biedrens and the one hand no look pass to guys on the wing.
User avatar
All Star
Posts: 1357
Joined: Mon Oct 04, 2004 4:21 pm
Location: Menlo Park, California
Poster Credit: 0
PostPosted: Sun Jan 21, 2007 9:20 pm
Warriors could win this deal
by: Marc Stein
posted: Wednesday, January 17, 2007 | Feedback | Print Entry
filed under: NBA, Golden State Warriors, Indiana Pacers, Ike Diogu, Mike Dunleavy, Troy Murphy, Keith McLeod, Stephen Jackson, Al Harrington, Sarunas Jasikevicius, Josh Powell

When Jermaine O'Neal unloaded his frustration with Indy's .500 (or so) season two weeks ago in Dallas, he openly wondered about the Pacers' roster mix.

"Are we a good fit for each other?" O'Neal asked aloud.

"Maybe, maybe not."

Or maybe this is the reality: O'Neal and his bosses already knew the answer.

I'm betting on the last of those maybes. It seems safe to presume that O'Neal wouldn't have publicly questioned Indiana's collective capabilities on Jan. 4 if he didn't have an inkling that Donnie Walsh and Larry Bird were actively looking to change the collective. Sooner rather than later.

It seems even safer to presume that the close relationship between Walsh and good friend Chris Mullin -- with a big-time nudge from agent Dan Fegan, who represents major players (Stephen Jackson and Troy Murphy) on both sides of Wednesday's eight-player swap -- sped up the process for two teams that were looking for serious shakeups and have decided to take on each other's problems.

A landscape-changing deal? No one's claiming that. You wouldn't try to make that argument for the team in either conference.

But this swap does allow Indiana and Golden State's Mullin to at least say that they've shuffled vigorously, with just over half the season remaining in both cases to see if they can make the new parts work better.

• Each team gets a player in the exchange that it has coveted for months.

For Indiana that's Ike Diogu, who was repeatedly deemed off-limits by the Warriors during last winter's Ron Artest talks.

For Golden State that's Al Harrington, its top free-agent target last summer before and after Don Nelson was hired as coach.

The Pacers believe Diogu will develop into a worthy sidekick for O'Neal ... or perhaps even O'Neal's replacement if they wind up needing one at season's end.

The Warriors, meanwhile, see Harrington as the athletic combo forward they've been lacking and a natural fit for Nelson's system, even though Harrington's return to Indiana to play alongside his good buddy JO hasn't come close to living up to the widespread forecasts of grandeur.

• Each team is likewise shedding a player (or two) who has worn out his welcome.

Indy has unexpectedly found a taker for Jackson, who obviously needs a change of scenery after incidents on the floor (in Detroit) and off (outside a strip club) that the locals will never forget, making him the No. 1 scapegoat in Indy since Artest left town.

Golden State, in turn, has shed the contracts of two vets (Murphy and Mike Dunleavy) who were supposed to flourish under Nelson but who were more likely to absorb public broadsides in the paper from the new coach than play significant minutes for him. As with Jackson, public patience in Oakland with Murphy and especially Dunleavy was long gone.

• Each team, furthermore, believes it couldn't say no in spite of the obvious pitfalls.

The Warriors counter concerns about Jackson by pointing out that he's been a successful shooter for a championship team in San Antonio and that each of the Pacers they acquired -- including Josh Powell and my beloved Sarunas Jasikevicius -- is a multi-position player more suited to Nellie's faster tempos and unconventional lineups.

The Pacers likewise aren't apologizing after deciding that Harrington, whom they worked so hard to get over the summer as their Peja Stojakovic/Artest replacement, didn't even last 41 games in his second Indy stint. They're not fretting about O'Neal's inevitable disappointment to see his man Harrington leave so soon, just when the Pacers were getting past their rough early schedule. Nor were they put off, apparently, by the fact that they're potentially taking back a whopping $33 million more than the Warriors in long-term salary obligations, believing they've improved their team chemistry significantly with players who are more coachable than those leaving and more suited to Rick Carlisle's possession style.

I suppose that I still have to pick a team that "won" this one, so I have to go with Golden State at first glance, mainly because the Warriors were able to move two albatross contracts (Dunleavy's ranking worse than Murphy's) without being forced to part with Baron Davis, Jason Richardson, Monta Ellis, Andris Biedrins, Mickael Pietrus or even Matt Barnes ... and selfishly because Nellie has a history of getting beaucoup production from guys named Sarunas (see: Marciulionis).

To be swayed back in Indiana's direction would require knowing that Diogu will definitely turn out to be a player . . . or knowing how O'Neal's future will play out, with JO and management still on course for an end-of-season date to re-assess their futures together . . . or knowing for certain that the Pacers could now move Dunleavy to the Clippers for Corey Maggette. Informed sources in L.A. insist that the Clips won't do that deal even if Clips coach Mike Dunleavy Sr. keeps lobbying for it.






Trade analysis: Pacers may hit home run in long run
Insider
Hollinger
By John Hollinger
ESPN Insider
Archive

Whoa … Where'd that come from?

Even the most brazen rumormongers were taken by surprise Wednesday when the Warriors and Pacers agreed on an eight-player trade that sends Troy Murphy, Mike Dunleavy, Ike Diogu and Keith McLeod to Indiana for Al Harrington, Stephen Jackson, Sarunas Jasikevicius and Josh Powell.

On the surface, this looks like a classic "grass-is-greener" trade.

Contrary to the expectations of many, Dunleavy and Murphy haven't meshed with new coach Don Nelson and his wide-open system, though Dunleavy has raised his level of play.

Meanwhile, the mutterings about chemistry problems in Indiana long have centered on Jackson -- especially since his arrest on felony charges in October -- and Harrington has endured an unexpectedly bumpy ride in his first campaign since rejoining the Pacers.

Ike Diogu
Rocky Widner/Getty Images
Ike Diogu may be able to showcase his talents in Indiana.

Look a little deeper, though, and you'll see this more as a Trojan horse deal.

Why? Because, while Jackson, Dunleavy, Murphy and Harrington are the four names in all the headlines, the guy who could make the trade a home run for the Pacers is Diogu.

The 6-8 second-year forward has had trouble getting minutes in Nelson's perimeter-oriented, smallball-friendly system. But while he's averaged just 13.1 minutes a game in 17 appearances, Diogu has played brilliantly when given the chance.

Per 40 minutes, his numbers jump off the page -- 22.2 points, 11.4 rebounds and 2.0 blocks. He's shooting 53 percent from the floor and 79.6 percent from the line, with the last number particularly important because he draws so many fouls in the low post. Overall, his PER of 18.8 is easily the highest of any player in the trade.

Based on his rookie season stats from a year ago, this season's numbers don't seem like a fluke. Diogu's rookie year PER of 15.8 also beats the 2006-07 rating of anyone else in the deal, as his percentages were nearly identical and his 40-minute numbers (18.8 points, 8.9 boards) weren't too far off.

So why didn't Diogu play more? Nelson's system obviously had a lot to do with it, but so did Diogu's defense. He can block shots, but he's a bit short for a power forward and, like most other young players, he struggles at that end of the floor. Paired with another developing big man in Andris Biedrins, Diogu had nobody to cover for his mistakes, so it was easier in many cases to leave him on the pine.

As a Pacer, however, he'll be paired with one of the best frontcourt defenders in the league in Jermaine O'Neal, and when O'Neal checks out another elite defender, Jeff Foster, will check in. As a result, Indiana should be much better positioned to mask Diogu's defensive shortcomings than Golden State was.

Also, the Pacers' post-oriented attack is much more in keeping with Diogu's skill set than the freewheeling system Nellie ran in Golden State. So if anything, his already prodigious output may increase now that he's joining the Pacers, at least on a per-possession basis.

There might be other dividends for Indy as well. With this deal, the Pacers have an even bigger logjam in the frontcourt, with O'Neal, Foster, Murphy, Diogu, Maceo Baston and David Harrison. A trade of one of them for a wing player would be the obvious follow-up to this move.

And if Murphy's jumper can find the net consistently, he may provide spacing for O'Neal to go to work down low.

Al Harrington
Brian Babineau/Getty Images
Al Harrington will be a welcome sight for Warriors fans who had tired of Mike Dunleavy, Jr.

Golden State fans will point out they didn't come out of this empty-handed, either. For starters, Jackson and Harrington are better defenders than Murphy and Dunleavy -- the difference isn't huge, but it may prove important given how horrid the Warriors' defense has been of late.

The Warriors also got themselves into better shape contract-wise. The deals that GM Chris Mullin handed out to Murphy and Dunleavy had become notorious albatrosses in Oakland, while the contracts of Harrington and Jackson expire a year earlier and are slightly less onerous.

And Golden State upgraded the point guard position behind Baron Davis by getting Jasikevicius (to replace McLeod), an important consideration given how injury-prone Davis is.

Nonetheless, it's shocking to see the Warriors include such a talented prospect as Diogu as a throw-in, especially considering a year earlier they wouldn't budge on putting him into a deal for Ron Artest.

It's not like including him was necessary to balance the scales. Going by 2006-07 PER, the three highest-rated players in this deal all went to Indiana. In fact, Murphy has outrated Harrington in four of the past five seasons (including this one). And while Jackson is preferable to Dunleavy on talent, he is a huge question mark in the chemistry department -- not to mention a guy who has to stand trial in Indianapolis in February.

So if you take Diogu and Powell out of the trade, this deal starts looking a lot more reasonable -- Golden State upgrades the backcourt a bit, gets a slight improvement in the cap situation, takes on a bad apple in the locker room and makes a slight downgrade from Murphy to Harrington. That seems fair.

But to throw in Diogu on top of it? That's absurd. Or it's genius, if you're looking at it from Indiana's perspective.

The other names are nice and all, but 10 years from now I have a feeling that we'll be looking back on this deal as the Ike Diogu trade. And if you're a Warriors fan, you probably won't be looking back fondly.





An instant analysis of the big Warriors-Pacers trade:

GOLDEN STATE
With Troy Murphy and Mike Dunleavy out of Nellie's favor, Golden State has been looking to move its two forwards. If the trade is examined in this light alone, the Warriors scored -- they replaced two highly-paid players the coach didn't want with guys who figure to contribute to the cause. They also upgraded their athleticism and defense.

The cost was Ike Diogu, whom I was surprised to see in this deal.

Diogu may not develop into an All-Star, but I believe he will put up good offensive numbers as his opportunities grow, and build significant value as time moves on -- he might be a poor-man's Zach Randolph.

Like Murphy and Dunleavy, Diogu was clearly not a part of Nellie's plans, and it's hard to build value if you don't play. This was probably a tough call for the Warriors, but at the same time, by including Diogu, they moved a lot of money off the books and got some pieces they wanted.

The Warriors are now quite deep at the three perimeter positions and figure to play small with Harrington at the four. When Richardson returns, the question will be how to find minutes for all these guys, but Nellie is a master at upping the tempo and keeping his players happy. If things are too crowded, they now have a host of potential trade assets in their guards and wings.

Golden State did not address their primary weakness, which is their interior defense, but you can't build Rome in a day, even with an eight-player trade. They did, however, take a step in the right direction defensively, adding quickness, length and versatility for a coach who makes better use of versatile, interchangeable players than anyone else around.

INDIANA
Indiana got a player it clearly wanted in Diogu, so that's a plus. (More on him below.)

With the addition of Murphy and Dunleavy, Indiana improves its ability to space the floor around the team's focal point, Jermaine O'Neal, but the Pacers will struggle to guard opponents -- the players they picked up in this deal are non-athletic types who are challenged to contain quick players.

Luckily, Indiana has one of the best defensive coaches in the league in Rick Carlisle. I can't think of many people more capable of getting this group to play smart, hard-nosed D as a unit. They'll have to.

BOTTOM LINE
I don't see this deal making either a team to fear, but both are idling around the .500 mark and at least get a shot in the arm.

Diogu is the lone impact player -- or possible impact player -- in the deal who's yet to reach his potential. He could prove to be the most valuable player in the trade, especially given that he has two seasons remaining on his rookie deal after this one.

If Diogu can become a significant low-post scorer for Indiana, he could (alongside the likes of Danny Granger, David Harrison and Shawne Williams) become an important piece of the foundation for the next generation of Pacers basketball.

Scouts Inc. NBA analyst Jeff Weltman was assistant general manager of the Denver Nuggets from 2001 to 2006. From 1988 to 2001, he served the Los Angeles Clippers in various personnel, scouting and administrative roles.

Starting Lineup
Posts: 675
Joined: Wed Jul 07, 2004 11:00 am
Location: THE City
Poster Credit: 0
PostPosted: Mon Jan 22, 2007 1:45 pm
Thanks for posting the articles all, and it's great to be back TMC... I've been around but got tired of defending myself as a fan of the team... so stopped posting for awhile. But now Foyle has been permanently benched and murph and dumb are gone
Here we go again...

All Star
Posts: 1128
Joined: Thu Mar 03, 2005 11:06 am
Location: East Bay
Poster Credit: 5
PostPosted: Mon Jan 22, 2007 6:03 pm
thanks for the insiders reports.. i heavily disagree with all but stein's analysis..getting rid of dun and murphy saved the warriors more than slightly. making the trade happen giving up diogu now means that we CAN sign the likes of ellis, biedrins, and possibly pietrus as well... which if any of these "experts" knew what was really going on, they'd figure that giving up ike and what he might turn out to be at best (an undersized but lethal scorer, average defense, average rebounding--which will never merit an all star birth---although you never know in the east!!) was good because of the real gems we have in biedrins and ellis that we can now keep...
"Losing is inevitably close to winning," Guber said. "They're inches apart. Drama. If you have drama, you've got a ticket to sell." "They're not real fans," Lacob said. "They don't have season tickets."
User avatar
Hall of Famer
Posts: 18461
Joined: Sat Oct 08, 2005 4:48 am
Location: Somewhere in this site...
Poster Credit: -4
PostPosted: Tue Jan 23, 2007 5:13 am
What I found ludicrous is that every single anal-yst that likes the trade for the Pacers DOESN'T SAY A SINGLE WORD ABOUT THE CONTRACTS MURPH AND DUN HAVE.

It's like they just see the names, without looking at any game or the figures on their contracts.



Anal-yst 1: Hey, you have traded for Shaq. Great job.

Analyst with brain: Gee, I don't know. Trading 10 first rounders for a 35 year's old Shaq who's more often injured than not doesn't look like a great deal.

Anal-yst 1: BUT... BUT, IT IS SHAQ!!!!!!! :headbang: :headbang:


Some of these f*ckers are dumber than a box of (retarded) rocks.
User avatar
All Star
Posts: 3086
Joined: Fri Jul 21, 2006 9:51 pm
Location: Redwood City, CA
Poster Credit: 0
PostPosted: Tue Jan 23, 2007 11:19 am
Yeah. It's just too much to ask for an analysist to watch every single team sem-consistently. This forces them to make judgements based on stats (Hollinger).

Local writers who watch the Warriors more seem to know what they're talking about more than the ESPN guys.

Return to Warriors Basketball

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: Google [Bot] and 1 guest

cron