*OFFICIAL WARRIORS SOLD THREAD*

Discuss anything related to Golden State Warriors basketball here

Moderators: Mr. Crackerz, JREED, Guybrush, 32

User avatar

Role Player
Posts: 392
» Thu Jul 15, 2010 6:37 pm
STEIN_LINE_HQ

Warriors coach Don Nelson tells ESPN.com he hopes to convince Dubs' new owners to let him coach final season on his contract. Link soon
User avatar

Role Player
Posts: 392
» Thu Jul 15, 2010 6:37 pm
STEIN_LINE_HQ

Nelson gets his $6 mil next season either way but says he's excited about what could be w/D-Lee and Curry: "I'd love to coach next year."
User avatar

Role Player
Posts: 392
» Thu Jul 15, 2010 6:38 pm
Matt Steinmetz MSteinmetzCSN

Larry Riley says stuff that's out there about Don Nelson considering retiring are "erroneous."
User avatar

Role Player
Posts: 392
» Thu Jul 15, 2010 6:45 pm
Peter Guber Q and A

Peter Guber, who along with Joe Lacob shocked the basketball world by beating out Larry Ellison to become part of the new Warriors ownership group, just called. Here's what he had to say:

What are your emotions on the day you bought the Golden State Warriors?
This is like launching any big event and realizing that this is just the beginning. It's not even the end of the beginning. This is the beginning of the beginning.

How much can you say about the final days of the process? All I can tell you is that we just did this and it's not finished until the papers are concluded and we have league approval. I can't answer all of the things that will be meaningful to you right now, but I will answer everything when it's all done. We had two eyes on the front, while glancing in the rearview mirror, and while remaining committed to winning. I had a little bit of sphincter arrest when we got it, but it is only about the joy of being able to participate in something great.

How will you and Joe Lacob run the franchise?
He has incredible financial acumen, he lives in the Bay Area and he's a lifelong Warriors fan. He has great familiarity with basketball, he's extremely clever and he understands partnerships. ... I have an extremely broad background in location-based entertainment. I can handle really challenging talent, I understand collaborative talent, and I understand the difference between winning and losing in everything.

You sound pretty competitive. How true is that? I understand that we have a product that we're responsible for. We're responsible for putting a competitive and compelling team on the court. We want every single component of the franchise to be the best.

Why are the Warriors worth $450 million? We're in a magical venue in the Bay Area. The NBA is global, we're in a coastal economy in a place where players want to play and we've got a collective bargaining agreement that is emerging. There is a robust fan base. Whatever it has been called, the fans have showed for this team.

Are you considering moving the Warriors back to San Francisco? I wouldn't even begin to answer that question, but I can promise you that the Warriors will always stay in the Bay Area. You would have to be the dumbest mutt in the mafia to consider a move. That team must play in that area: Oakland, San Francisco, San Jose. That area is so robust, so sports-rich. It's inconceivable to think about moving the team.

How big a sports fan are you? I've been around NBA people all of my life. I tried to buy the Lakers while I was at Sony. I worked very hard on it. I worked at buying the Oakland A's and thought we had the deal done. I've always been around sports. I had a hockey team for five or six years, and we started building minor-league baseball teams all around the country. I've been in sports a long time, and sports is really an entertainment vehicle. We intend to win, but you also have to provide the service of entertainment to the audience.
User avatar

All Star
Posts: 1143
» Thu Jul 15, 2010 6:50 pm
I know everyone hates Don Nelson, but I really want to see him coach out his final year with healthy and new guys.
User avatar

All Star
Posts: 3064
» Thu Jul 15, 2010 7:09 pm
TheBodyGuard wrote:I know everyone hates Don Nelson, but I really want to see him coach out his final year with healthy and new guys.


There is the catch 22... He'll just play guys small and get them injured and make it seem like he's doing such a great job with what he has... I think Nelson had his moments here, but i think you need a specific lineup for it to work. It's just not worth it. Make all the changes this season, so you have a headstart on next season and possibly a high draft pick. Lets just enjoy this year for what it is, the first year without Cohan in a long long time.
User avatar

All Star
Posts: 3242
» Thu Jul 15, 2010 7:13 pm
saying all the right things in the Q A

I'm excited!!


(and perhaps even a little aroused)
User avatar

All Star
Posts: 3064
» Thu Jul 15, 2010 7:16 pm
Quazza wrote:saying all the right things in the Q A

I'm excited!!


(and perhaps even a little aroused)


Yeah its good first of all to have change. Lets hope they build a structure the right way. Most everybody has a little disappointment that Ellison didn't get the dubs because there are just less barriers with a man that rich. But I gotta give these guys a chance. If for some reason it turns out like Cohan part 2, bye bye NBA
User avatar

All Star
Posts: 1768
» Thu Jul 15, 2010 7:22 pm
Well, Good bye Cohan....no miss and love....

We'll see New W's in the future...
But, still some upper management staff need to be changed...

Anyway, Its a good day for Bayarea , especially for W's fans.... :D

Rookie
Posts: 88
» Thu Jul 15, 2010 7:59 pm
is anyone else sick to their stomach that cohan got that much $ ?
User avatar

Role Player
Posts: 392
» Thu Jul 15, 2010 8:02 pm
Guber is now responding to tweets from fans.
User avatar

All Star
Posts: 2341
» Thu Jul 15, 2010 8:07 pm
He says some good things... Hopefully, this Lacob guy cares more about the winning of basketball games end of things and less about the entertainment aspect that this guy seems focused on.
User avatar

Role Player
Posts: 392
» Thu Jul 15, 2010 8:09 pm
ESPN article

OAKLAND, Calif. -- Golden State Warriors owner Chris Cohan reached an agreement Thursday to sell the franchise for a record $450 million to Boston Celtics minority partner Joe Lacob and Mandalay Entertainment CEO Peter Guber.

"I am incredibly excited to have the opportunity to be the next steward of this storied NBA franchise. This is my dream come true," said Lacob, who is also the managing partner with Kleiner Perkins Caufield & Byers. "Peter and I intend to do what we do best -- innovating and building. It is our passion to return the Warriors to greatness and build nothing short of a championship organization that will make all of us in the Bay Area proud."

Lacob and Guber beat out three other finalists, including Oracle CEO Larry Ellison, who had been considered the favorite to buy the team from Cohan. Ellison has a personal fortune of $28 billion, according to an annual survey by Forbes magazine, and is the sixth-richest man in the world.

He had been courted by Warriors fans at a game earlier this year to buy the struggling franchise, which has made the playoffs only once in the past 16 seasons. Ellison said in a statement that he was surprised he did not win because he made the biggest offer.

"Although I was the highest bidder, Chris Cohan decided to sell to someone else," he said. "In my experience this is a bit unusual. Nonetheless, I wish the Warriors and their fans nothing but success under their new ownership."

Sal Galatioto, the president of Galatioto Sports Partners, which advised Cohan on the sale, said a handshake agreement with Lacob and Guber was agreed to about two weeks ago. The team had four offers of at least $400 million at the time of the deadline.

While the two sides worked out the details, Ellison came back with what Galatioto described as a "marginally higher" offer just hours before the signing.

"He was way past the deadline," Galatioto said. "There was no way I was going to recommend that bid to Chris. ... Once the shot clock expires, are you allowed to get back on the court and have it count? I don't think so."


A league source told ESPN.com's J.A. Adande that Ellison was done in by his own doing.

"Everybody knows he can afford more than $450 [million]," the source said. "We all know Larry Ellison can buy any team in the league.

"If you know Larry Ellison as a businessman, if you see he paid $6 milion for a company it probably was worth $8 billion. He doesn't pay what people want"

The bid from Lacob and Guber broke the record for the largest sale in league history, topping the $401 million Robert Sarver paid to buy the Phoenix Suns in 2004.

The deal still needs to be approved by three-quarters of the NBA Board of Governors. Lacob also must sell his interest in the Celtics. Galatioto said he expects the deal to be finalized by the end of September.

Lacob, who has been a season-ticket holder for the Warriors, was part of the ownership group with the Celtics when they won their 17th championship two years ago. He has also been involved in sports websites and was the primary investor in the women's American Basketball League in venture capital.

Guber is a producer who helped bring movies such as "Rain Man," "Batman," "Flashdance" and "The Color Purple" to the screen. In 1995, he founded the Mandalay Entertainment Group with partner Paul Schaeffer, who will also be an owner of the team. Mandalay has financed, produced and distributed numerous motion pictures including "Donnie Brasco," "Enemy at the Gates" and "Seven Years in Tibet."

Cohan has had financial problems. In 2007, the Internal Revenue Service said he owed more than $160 million in back income taxes and penalties from the 1998 sale of a cable television company.

Cohan bought the Warriors in January 1995 for about $119 million and the team made the playoffs just once in his entire tenure. The only other franchises that have been in the league since then to make the playoffs fewer than five times are the Los Angeles Clippers with two appearances and the Memphis/Vancouver Grizzlies with three.

The one playoff berth came in 2007, when the Warriors became the first No. 8 seed to beat the top seed in a best-of-seven series. Golden State lost to Utah in the following round and failed to make the playoffs in 2008 despite winning 48 games. The Warriors have reverted to form the past two seasons with 55 total wins in that span.

But despite the long run of on-court struggles, Golden State has a passionate fan base that has helped pack Oracle Arena in recent years and made the team a desirable target for a new owner.

Cohan thanked the Warriors fans, calling them the "best fans in all of sports."

One of the first major decisions the new owners will have to make is whether to keep the Warriors management team in place. Coach Don Nelson has one year and $6 million remaining on his contract. President Robert Rowell and general manager Larry Riley also could be replaced.


Link
Last edited by GoldenStJayhawk on Thu Jul 15, 2010 8:12 pm, edited 1 time in total.
User avatar

Role Player
Posts: 392
» Thu Jul 15, 2010 8:11 pm
Some info on the new owners from TrueHoop

Warriors owner Chris Cohan has just reached an agreement to sell his team for $450 million to Joe Lacob and Peter Guber. The news comes as a surprise as people around the NBA had long assumed that Oracle's Larry Ellison would be the next owner.

So, who are Lacob and Gruber?

The short answer is that Lacob is the managing partner with Kleiner Perkins Caufield & Byers while Guber is the CEO of Mandalay Entertainment. Here is a little more insight:

* In addition to being a minority owner of the Celtics, Lacob is a partner at one of the most prestigious venture capital firms in the world (where Al Gore also works, incidentally). He has been involved in a lot of health-care investments, but also Sportsline and big NBA advertiser Autotrader.com. New environmental technologies are a growing part of the company's portfolio, too, and The New York Times calls the firm "Silicon Valley’s cleantech kingmaker." A quick Wall Street Journal analysis of the deal suggests the Warriors -- with a relentlessly loyal fan base but a lousy team and a valuation that has slipped -- could be ripe for a savvy investor to turn a profit. Does that philosophy still apply now that we know Lacob and Gruber paid tens of millions more than anyone had previously paid for an NBA team?

* Guber co-stars in a 1996 unauthorized and salacious book chronicling Guber's time running Sony Pictures with Jon Peters. From the Publishers Weekly review of "Hit & Run" by Nancy Griffin and Kim Masters: "This is basically the story of two boys who never grew up, but ended up running Sony-owned Columbia Pictures into the ground. Peters, whom the Los Angeles Times described as a 'seventh-grade dropout and reform school graduate who began his show-business career as Barbra Steisand's hairdresser-boyfriend-manager,' was a master at self-promotion; only semi-literate but able to count well enough to make it big in Hollywood. Bostonian Guber earned several academic degrees before 'going Hollywood,' somehow managing to indifferently run several studios and make high profits and only a few good films."

* There's lots of interesting stuff to say about Peter Guber's film and television career. I'd tell you all about it, but it's probably simpler if you just watch the relentless ego indulgence that is touted as the Mandalay Entertainment reel, but is 100 percent ode to Guber, with Mandalay footnotes.

* Guber weighed in on LeBron James' decision last week. He said on FOX that he did not agree with Dan Gilbert's reaction: "Give me a break, will you? [LeBron's] in business. ... This is a 25-year-old kid who wants to put his product in the best marketplace. He gave them seven great years of complete loyalty and built himself from the ground up. He has a right to put that product in the best marketplace, on the best shelves, and think about the future. It's a team sport. He wanted to surround himself with the kind of people that would help build that legacy. I think he did a hell of a job."

* Guber says he learned an amazing amount about leadership from the movie "Lawrence of Arabia", as he explained on the Washington Post's website. Here he talks about the tribes T.E. Lawrence was charged with uniting Arab groups to fight the Turks: "They fought each other more than they fought the Turks! And he kept thinking about it and thinking about it. Finally he came up with one word. Aqaba. If he could get there, the disparate tribes would believe that they could do the impossible. Cross the Nefud desert and attack the Turks from the rear. ... If they could get there to do the impossible, this one small piece of impossible, they would believe anything's possible, and that uniting them's possible."



Link
User avatar

All Star
Posts: 1530
» Thu Jul 15, 2010 8:31 pm
GoldenStJayhawk wrote:Some info on the new owners from TrueHoop

Warriors owner Chris Cohan has just reached an agreement to sell his team for $450 million to Joe Lacob and Peter Guber. The news comes as a surprise as people around the NBA had long assumed that Oracle's Larry Ellison would be the next owner.

So, who are Lacob and Gruber?

The short answer is that Lacob is the managing partner with Kleiner Perkins Caufield & Byers while Guber is the CEO of Mandalay Entertainment. Here is a little more insight:

* In addition to being a minority owner of the Celtics, Lacob is a partner at one of the most prestigious venture capital firms in the world (where Al Gore also works, incidentally). He has been involved in a lot of health-care investments, but also Sportsline and big NBA advertiser Autotrader.com. New environmental technologies are a growing part of the company's portfolio, too, and The New York Times calls the firm "Silicon Valley’s cleantech kingmaker." A quick Wall Street Journal analysis of the deal suggests the Warriors -- with a relentlessly loyal fan base but a lousy team and a valuation that has slipped -- could be ripe for a savvy investor to turn a profit. Does that philosophy still apply now that we know Lacob and Gruber paid tens of millions more than anyone had previously paid for an NBA team?

* Guber co-stars in a 1996 unauthorized and salacious book chronicling Guber's time running Sony Pictures with Jon Peters. From the Publishers Weekly review of "Hit & Run" by Nancy Griffin and Kim Masters: "This is basically the story of two boys who never grew up, but ended up running Sony-owned Columbia Pictures into the ground. Peters, whom the Los Angeles Times described as a 'seventh-grade dropout and reform school graduate who began his show-business career as Barbra Steisand's hairdresser-boyfriend-manager,' was a master at self-promotion; only semi-literate but able to count well enough to make it big in Hollywood. Bostonian Guber earned several academic degrees before 'going Hollywood,' somehow managing to indifferently run several studios and make high profits and only a few good films."

* There's lots of interesting stuff to say about Peter Guber's film and television career. I'd tell you all about it, but it's probably simpler if you just watch the relentless ego indulgence that is touted as the Mandalay Entertainment reel, but is 100 percent ode to Guber, with Mandalay footnotes.

* Guber weighed in on LeBron James' decision last week. He said on FOX that he did not agree with Dan Gilbert's reaction: "Give me a break, will you? [LeBron's] in business. ... This is a 25-year-old kid who wants to put his product in the best marketplace. He gave them seven great years of complete loyalty and built himself from the ground up. He has a right to put that product in the best marketplace, on the best shelves, and think about the future. It's a team sport. He wanted to surround himself with the kind of people that would help build that legacy. I think he did a hell of a job."

* Guber says he learned an amazing amount about leadership from the movie "Lawrence of Arabia", as he explained on the Washington Post's website. Here he talks about the tribes T.E. Lawrence was charged with uniting Arab groups to fight the Turks: "They fought each other more than they fought the Turks! And he kept thinking about it and thinking about it. Finally he came up with one word. Aqaba. If he could get there, the disparate tribes would believe that they could do the impossible. Cross the Nefud desert and attack the Turks from the rear. ... If they could get there to do the impossible, this one small piece of impossible, they would believe anything's possible, and that uniting them's possible."



Link


It sounds like Dumb and Dumber lucked their way through life and ended up with the Warriors. Still, we
are probably better off than we were with Cohan. That's not saying much though.

Who is online

Users browsing this forum: Baidu [Spider], Google [Bot] and 23 guests